nanoparticle technology considered in the treatment of brain cancer

A team of biologists from Bordeaux has just received funding to continue its research into the development of a treatment that uses nanoparticle technology. This is to fight glioblastoma, a very aggressive brain tumor.

The research is just beginning, but the treatment looks promising. They are carried out by Bordeaux chemists from the polymer chemistry laboratory at the National Polytechnic Institute of Bordeaux, which has just obtained funding from the Foundation for Medical Research (FRM).

A specific cancer, a specific treatment. This is the hope of this research. Because glioblastoma is one of the most aggressive brain tumors. It affects approximately 2,000 people in France each year, including nearly 200 in Bordeaux.

So far, there is no effective treatment. Prior to this new research, no major progress had been made since 2005. Unfortunately, this is a so-called “poor prognosis” cancer, as the average life expectancy of affected patients is 18 months.

The Bordeaux researchers’ idea is to use the technology for nanoparticles, infinitely small molecules that would enhance the effect of radio or chemotherapy. Their small size would allow them to carry the treatment to the cells that need it. These chemists claim to create a structure that will mimic the behavior of proteins naturally present in the skin.
On this supporting structure, they combine a chemical substance that, once activated by X-rays from radiation therapy, could destroy more tumor cells than we are able to today thanks to surgery or therapies.

The treatment will then be used after surgery to remove the tumor. A fluorescent nanoparticle gel would be used around the operated surface to hunt down remaining tumor cells and destroy them.

Sébastien Lecommandoux is project coordinator and director of the polymer laboratory in Bordeaux. “The goal is to be able to continue to destroy tumor cells that the surgeon would not have removed completely. What we want is to be able to capture these tumor cells and break them down after surgery.“.

But we must still speak in the conditional because caution is essential. Research continues on mice before testing this treatment on humans because it should not be harmful to the human brain. The first clinical trial can be performed within 5 to 10 years.

See the report by Eva Huin and Jean-François Géa.




video length: 02min 04

A team of biologists from Bordeaux has just received funding to continue its research into the development of a treatment that uses nanoparticle technology. This is to fight glioblastoma, a very aggressive brain tumor.



©French television

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